Bill Russo to Chair “Future Cars” Panel at September Automotive Roundtable

Shanghai, China, September 1, 2016

Inbox Microsoft Outlook, Today at 2.33.36 PM

As the development of automotive electronics and telematics is gaining speed, intelligent car applications are gradually and successfully integrated in our daily lives.

The numerous advantages of latest technologies do not only include an improved driving experience or enhanced safety, but also the evolution towards less fuel consumption and more sustainable driving.

Therefore, the September Automotive Roundtable in Shanghai will discuss promising trends of future cars in China and its latest applications in several areas, such as Driver Assistance Systems, Autonomous Driving, Automotive Multimedia & Communication, Connected Vehicles and Online Services in China.

– in cooperation with Autoköpfe –

– Strategic Partner: EU Chamber –

When: Thursday, September 01, 2016, 6 pm

6:00 – 7:00 pm: Registration and Networking Dinner, incl. buffet dinner

7:00 pm: Presentation:

By Mr. Roger Looney, VP of Vehicle Engineering – Vehicle Systems Development, including Electric Drivetrain & Autonomous Driving, Qoros

Roger Looney has 30 Years experience in automotive tooling, engineering and design and over 20 years experience in Asia. Current goals include utilizing that knowledge and experience to develop world class, exciting vehicles of the future.
Specialties: Automotive Product Development and Launch, Electronics, Hybrid & EV development, Asia Mergers and Acquisitions, Six Sigma, Product Development, New Business Development in Asia, Team Building in China, Low Cost Country Sourcing, Contract Development and Negotiation in China, Korea, Japan.
 

7:20 pm: Presentation: Integrated Mobility, Transportation Redefined

By Mr. Bevin Jacob, Head of Biz Dev, APAC, Continental Intelligent Transportation Systems

An ‘Internet of Vehicles’ enthusiast, Bevin Jacob envisions building and incorporating “Mobility Services” to improve Consumer’s digital lifestyle. He has 16 years of active involvement in building “Connected Solutions” for Mobile, Telematics and Multimedia Devices. Bevin enjoys working with highly motivated teams to bring about disruptive innovations in connected vehicles business.

7:40 pm: Panel discussion: Future Cars

Moderator: Mr. Bill Russo, Managing Director, Gao Feng Advisory Company

Bill Russo is the Shanghai-based Managing Director and the Automotive Practice leader at Gao Feng Advisory Company. His over 30 years of experience includes 15 years as an automotive executive, including 12 years of experience in China and Asia. He has also worked nearly 12 years in the electronics and information technology industries.  He has worked as an advisor and consultant for numerous multinational and local Chinese firms in the formulation and implementation of their global market and product strategies. While the Vice President of Chrysler North East Asia, he successfully negotiated agreements with partners and obtained required approvals from the China government to bring six new vehicle programs to the market in a three-year period, while concurrently establishing an infrastructure for local sourcing and sales distribution. Mr. Russo has a Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering from Columbia University in New York, and a Master of Science in Manufacturing Systems Engineering from Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Mr. Russo is a highly sought after opinion leader on the development of the China market and the automotive industry.

Panel additionally includes:

 Ms. Vanessa Moriel, Managing Director Asia, Liase Group

Vanessa Moriel is Managing Director Asia with the LIASE Group, a global retained executive search firm & talent management consultancy that specializes exclusively in automotive and mobility companies. 

Ms. Moriel has been providing CEO & top management placements and succession expertise for global automotive companies across the Asia-Pacific region for close to 15 years. She previously worked for Schlumberger, the London Consulting Group, Frito-Lay (Pepsico) and Fiducia Management Consultants. 

She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering for the Institute of Technology and Superior Studies of Monterrey and has completed an Executive Program in Strategy and Organization from the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Mr. John Shen, Managing Director, Accenture Strategy, Greater China

Mr. Shen Jun has more than 20 years of industry and management consulting experience. He is now Managing Director with Accenture Strategy Greater China. Before he joined Accenture, Mr. Shen was Senior Partner at Roland Berger Strategy Consultants and has been leading the Automotive Competence Center (ACC) in Greater China. Mr. Shen has served many leading MNC/local companies in automotive industry, covering a wide range of topics. Mr. Shen has in-depth knowledge and expertise in the functional areas of corporate strategy, merger and acquisitions, operational benchmark, organizational restructuring and sales and marketing management (especially on branding, channel optimization, pricing and new product launch), etc.

8:10 pm: Q&A

Where: Courtyard by Marriott Shanghai Jiading 上海绿地万怡酒店

            3101 Huyi Highway, Jiading District, Shanghai 201821, P.R.C
上海嘉定区沪宜公路3101号

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Fee: 250 RMB/Person for annual spinsors, incl. buffer dinner, free flow soft drinks and beer

350RMB/Person for non-sponsors, incl. buffet dinner, free flow soft drinks and beer

(Please note only cash or pre-payment via bank transfer is accepted)

Hotel Room Information: The participants of Automotive Roundtable can enjoy the special rate of the hotel room: Superior Room: 550 RMB/night (incl. 1-2 breakfast). To book the room, please email to:

Ms. YILIA JIANG

Assistant Sales Manager

cy.shajd.sales.exe3@courtyard.com

Tel: 86.21.3991.6816,  mobile: 139.1831.2521

and indicate rate code of “Automotive Roundtable”.

Language: English

Seats are limited! If you like to attend, RSVP via email

kathrin@g-i-events.com or lucia@g-i-events.com by August 30, 2016.

In case you register but cannot attend, please cancel your reservation before August 30. Otherwise you will be invoiced for the event.

Thanks to all our sponsors and our media partner!

If you are interested in sponsoring, speaking or participating, please feel free to contact us at: info@g-i-events.com.

 

The Explosive Growth Opportunity in China’s Automotive Aftermarket

Gao Feng Insights Report, August 2016

We are pleased to share with you our paper titled: The Explosive Growth Opportunity in China’s Automotive Aftermarket.  In this report, we examine one of the major discontinuities shaping the future of the Chinese auto market:  the rapid expansion of the independent aftermarket (IAM).

China’s automotive market is transitioning from a period of rapid growth in new car sales to a slower pattern of expansion going forward.  While this slower pattern of growth is a concern for automakers and suppliers, the market remains at historically high levels of sales, and the car population continues to expand at double digit rates annually.  In addition, the average age of the vehicle population is rising.  Add to this a recent push by the Chinese government to allow sales of original equipment service (OES) parts by independent service providers, coupled with the emergence of digital platforms for accessing services, the conditions are ripe for discontinuous expansion of the independent aftermarket.

All of these factors are contributing to an explosive expansion of the automotive aftermarket services business in China.  In this environment, automakers and suppliers are seeking ways to offer a clear and differentiated value proposition in order to succeed in the aftermarket, and they must act quickly to compete with new entrants who are seeking to disrupt the traditional service model.

We welcome your comments and feedback on our briefing paper or in general about our firm. We would be glad to meet you in person to share our data and perspectives in a fuller manner. Please let us know if you are interested in meeting and discussing directly how we can help you to operationalize these insights.

Thought leadership is core to what Gao Feng does. We will, from time to time, share with you our latest thinking on business and management, especially as it relates to China and China’s role in the world.

Best Regards,

Bill Russo
Managing Director, Gao Feng Advisory Company
bill.russo@gaofengadv.com

Robert Zhang
Senior Associate, Gao Feng Advisory Company
robert.zhang@gaofengadv.com

Emily Wang
Senior Consultant, Gao Feng Advisory Company
emily.wang@gaofengadv.com

Disrupting the Disruptors: The Merger Of Uber China And Didi Chuxing

Forbes, August 8, 2016

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I co-authored this article with my colleague Edward Tse, CEO of Gao Feng Advisory Company

On August 1st, Didi Chuxing (Didi)and Uber China announced a plan to merge their businesses in China, effectively placing Didi in control of their combined ride-hailing business for the China market.  This deal has attracted a great deal of attention since the announcement, raising a number of critical questions which we address in this article, including:

  • Did the China government play any role in the merger?
  • Can foreign tech companies compete in China?
  • Did Uber China win or lose?
  • Could Uber China ever have become a dominant player in China if it decided to press ahead?
  • What will this deal mean to Uber and Didi’s global strategies?

China has become the epicenter of a disruptive wave of digital innovation, and the rapidly evolving landscape of partnerships for mobility services is a clear indication of this.  For sure, we can look forward to even more exciting developments in the future.

Click here to read the article at Forbes.com

Uber-Didi Merger Has Chinese Consumers Worried

The Sixth Tone, August 2, 2016

A passenger holds a smartphone showing the Didi Chuxing application, Shanghai, May 22, 2016. Qilai Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images/VCG
A passenger holds a smartphone showing the Didi Chuxing application, Shanghai, May 22, 2016. Qilai Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images/VCG

by Fan Yiying

After a prolonged price war for ride-hailing customers, Chinese market leader Didi Chuxing and its biggest rival Uber merged on Monday. Now, passengers are worried this will mean a quick end to heavily discounted trips.

Shanghai native Ma Yanyan, 29, rides with either Uber or Didi to work every day. She told Sixth Tone that she has noticed Uber is sending fewer coupons to its users. “As a consumer, I’m very realistic,” she said. “I’ll go back to taking taxis once Uber raises its prices.”

Wang Mengyan, 25, is a frequent user of ride-hailing apps, and she is afraid the merger will mean higher prices. “As a consumer,” she told Sixth Tone, “we want to see competition between Didi and Uber so that we can enjoy the best discounts.”

Yang Mengyi, 28, told Sixth Tone she spends about 150 yuan (about $22) on Didi every week, but that she thought the merger wouldn’t have much of an impact. “Taxis will always be another option,” she said, adding that she prefers cabs because they are more strictly regulated.

Online, many net users echoed Yang’s opinion, saying that if prices rise too high, they will just go back to using regular taxis. News of the merger — and the possible end of discounted fares — has cab drivers delighted.

Chen Yugang, a taxi driver in the northern coastal city of Tianjin, expressed his relief after Monday’s news. He told Sixth Tone that he used to earn about 5,500 yuan per month before the emergence of car-hailing apps. His current monthly income has decreased to less than 3,000 yuan. “Why would passengers take a cab and pay me 20 yuan when they can ride with Uber for as low as 5 yuan?” he said.

Chen said that companies like Uber have disturbed the market, and he hopes the merger will bring consumers back to traditional taxis.

Bill Russo, an automobile consultant at Gao Feng Advisory Company in Shanghai, told Sixth Tone he estimates pricing may move somewhat higher after the merger, but that “it can’t be much higher for the simple reason that ride hailing services need to compete with taxis.” He added that, to Uber and Didi, the real purpose of the merger isn’t to increase prices, but to decrease costs in the form of incentives given out to passengers and drivers in order to win market share.

Full-time Shanghai-based Uber driver Xing Zhiwei told Sixth Tone that the news of the merger has him concerned. “In less than a year, the allowance for 12 rides has dropped from 150 yuan to 40 yuan,” said Xing, adding that he fears such driver subsidies will drop even further.

Zhuang Chunhui, a communications manager for Uber China, told Sixth Tone on Tuesday that the incentive policy for drivers will not change after the merger. She said that the amount of subsidies varies in different cities at the different times. “The discounts we offer to our users will also change from time to time,” she added, “but this has nothing to do with the merger either.”

Wang Mingze, a public relations manager for Didi Chuxing in Shanghai, said the merger will enable the company to increase the efficiency with which it accepts orders, and that this “can eventually increase the drivers’ incomes.” As for passengers, Wang said price is just one part of the service. “What’s more important is whether users can book the car and enjoy a comfortable ride whenever they want,” he said.

Additional reporting by Wang Lianzhang.

Click here to read the article at sixthtone.com

This car company ripped off Land Rover. Here’s why it might get away with it.

The Washington Post, July 19, 2016

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(LEFT) The 2017 Range Rover Evoque Convertible is debuted during the
Los Angeles Auto Show in Nov. 2015, in Los Angeles (AP Photo/John Locher).
(RIGHT) Jiangling Motor Co.’s Landwind X7 SUV is displayed at the
16th Shanghai International Automobile Industry Exhibition in April 2015
(Tomohiro Ohsumi/Bloomberg).

The cars are basically indistinguishable unless you hone in on the exact stitching of the seats or the fine arrangement of the headlights. Even then, changes are so minuscule, it’s nearly impossible to realize one of these vehicles costs $41,000, and the other just $21,700.

British luxury carmaker Jaguar Land Rover and Chinese carmaker Jiangling will go to court this summer in China to settle their dispute over what exactly is fair game in the auto industry. Can Chinese companies continue to get away with “shanzhai” — a Chinese term for prideful counterfeiting — of car designs?

Range Rover’s Evoque and Jiangling’s Landwind X7 are practically the same car to the untrained eye.

It’s a judicial battle that pits Western car companies against the burgeoning Chinese and East Asian market, and one that has captured the attention of economists, auto industry insiders and intellectual property experts.

The Chinese consumer market has grown exponentially since late 1980s economic reform. Some of the largest growth has come from auto companies, both state-owned and foreign joint-ventures. In 2008, when the market was still in its relative infancy, Chinese buyers purchased 9.4 million cars. By 2015, they bought 24.6 million.

And as the industry rapidly expands, Western carmakers, from the United States’ “big three” to German luxury brands to other imports, have rushed to gobble up market share, in the process flooding China and its comparably fledgling car companies with new vehicle models.

The best way Chinese manufacturers could compete was “shanzhai,” reverse engineering foreign products as a way to enter the market without overwhelming research expenditures.

“In the automotive industry, you can copy the look of the the vehicle, but the skills required for the highly complex integrated systems, if you’re a Chinese company, you don’t have engineers with long career histories with that capability,” said Bill Russo, managing director of Shanghai-based Gao Feng Advisory Company.

“So you shorten the life cycle by purchasing or licensing or reverse engineering. And this is not a Chinese-invented cycle.”

Imitation, as the idiom goes, is the sincerest form of flattery. But it’s also a great way to make money, something merchants have realized for hundreds of years.

The United States in the 1800s, for example, lacked authors who could stack up against British literary giants, so American publishers reprinted British works without paying heed to copyright laws, said Mark Bartholomew, a professor of law at the University at Buffalo.

Benjamin Franklin, the Benjamin Franklin, even published pirated works. William Wordsworth and Charles Dickens came to America to complain about it. The United States only stiffened its intellectual property laws once its industries, both mechanical and intellectual, matured by the end of the century.

“It boils down to economics,” Bartholomew said. “The Chinese economy doesn’t have this same tradition of the manufacturers like Ford or Hyundai or any of the folks who are making these cars. So if you don’t have these copyright laws, why pay if you can get away with it?”

China does have intellectual property laws, though, and it’s a signatory to international intellectual property agreements. But China’s laws are applied inconsistently, and even the international rules aren’t always enforced in China and elsewhere around the world.

Some countries recognize certain kind of intellectual property, but not others. For example, special door handles on a car: Are those a decorative creative works, or do they have some functionality? Creative works get copyrights. Objects with usefulness get patents. And states, not companies, are the arbiters of what objects get what protection.

It leaves multinational companies rushing to strategically secure their rights all over the world. In large established markets like the United States and Europe, car companies apply for protection right away. But in a developing market such as China — its auto market was until recently considered “developing” — those applications only became priorities over the last decade.

Smaller Chinese companies without strong market presence used past administrative delays as windows of opportunity. If intellectual property protection hadn’t been filed domestically, it was convenient to reverse engineer the product. And if the protection was filed sloppily, companies reverse engineered cars largely without the risk of prosecution.

Even when U.S. auto makers file their paperwork in the right way, China car companies enjoy remarkable home field advantage in their courts. More mature courts in Beijing or Shanghai might have judges more willing to hear out foreign companies, but rural courts or those in factory-heavy districts often show interest to local industry, including counterfeiters.

And so the copycats started coming. Honda fought a Chinese carmaker for 12 years for copying the CR-V. The Chery QQ riffed off the Chevrolet Spark in 2005. Shuanghuan’s CEO SUV model copied BMW’s X5 in 2007. Shuanghuan’s Noble copied Mercedes Benz’s Smartcar in 2009. The Lifan 320 copied the Mini Cooper Countryman in 2012.

Hummers and Porsches and Rolls Royces have been copied. Even Ferraris have been copied, and were shipped to Spain where they were seized by police.

“Anything known to mankind can be faked, even a Ferrari,” said said Frederick Mostert, past president of the International Trademark Association and a research fellow at University of Oxford and Peking University. To prove a point, he bought one and traveled with it and shows pictures of it at speaking engagements.

Ferraris, though, aren’t the counterfeits major car companies worry about. Any buyer looking for a luxury car is in the market to spend luxury car kind of money. That’s especially true in China, where consumers are extremely brand conscious, experts say. Nobody who wants a Land Rover is going to be fooled by a Landwind.

“People who buy [the Landwind] can’t afford the Land Rover,” said Russo, the Geo Feng consultant. “And of course if you’re the company that’s out there, you’re going to be pissed off about it, but nobody is getting confused.

“Get in that Landwind and drive it. I’ve driven many, many cars in China. It’s not the same car.”

As much as the counterfeits are inconveniences, it may be the lawsuits to stop the practice that may hurt Western automakers moreauto industry experts say. The Chinese public doesn’t like to see its industries get bullied. Plus, if one copycat company gets shut down, others pop back up. Western companies end up playing legal whack-a-mole with money they could use to make newer, better cars, said Kenneth D. Crews, a Los Angeles-based attorney and adjunct professor of law at Columbia University.

That kind of strategy actually trains customers to look for newer models and not settle on older ones that are more easily counterfeited. More mature Chinese car companies have grown up and away from copying other models. Once they made enough money to invest in research and original design, they did.

“These companies have grown to become more than just copycats,” Russo said. “They’re advanced and they’re innovative.”

Click here to read this article at washingtonpost.com

Tencent-Backed Company Aims to Launch Smart-Electric Cars Before 2020

 The Wall Street Journal, July 12, 2016

Tencent-Backed Company Aims to Launch Smart-Electric Cars Before 2020 - WSJ Safari, Today at 1.01.49 PM

A BMW electric car at a Beijing car show in April; Future Mobility has hired about 50 engineers from car makers including BMW for its smart-electric-vehicle project. PHOTO: REUTERS

Chinese auto startup Future Mobility seeks eventually to sell several hundred thousand luxury vehicles a year

BEIJING—An auto startup backed by internet giant Tencent Holdings Ltd. plans to start selling premium electric cars globally by 2020, joining other Chinese car makers in taking aim at an increasingly crowded luxury market.

Four month-old Future Mobility Corp. seeks eventually to sell several hundred thousand fully electric, highly automated, China-built vehicles a year. The company is also backed by Chinese luxury-car dealer Harmony New Energy Auto and Foxconn Technology Group, which assembles iPhones for Apple Inc. Apple has been working on its own autonomous electric car.

Deep-pocketed tech companies have backed a wave of new auto companies in China, where a drive to cut fuel consumption and pioneer the auto industry of the future has encouraged startups. Analysts, citing increasing competition and uncertainty over a subsidy-fueled boom in electric vehicles, question how such ambitions can be turned into reality.

“Our target is to create the first Chinese brand which is premium and internationally successful,” Carsten Breitfeld, chief executive of Future Mobility, told The Wall Street Journal in an interview on Tuesday. He said the company aims to sell cars in China, Europe and the U.S. and to compete with Audi AGBMW AG and Daimler AG’s Mercedes-Benz, which combine for three quarters of China’s luxury-car market.

The company will soon complete its first round of fundraising, Mr. Breitfeld said.

Last year China’s industrial regulator amended rules to allow nonautomotive companies to invest in the electric-car industry, which Beijing has subsidized to the tune of tens of billions of dollars.

Internet giants jumped right in. China’s annual motor show in April showcased smart vehicles powered by software from online-shopping company Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. and search provider Baidu Inc. Last month, a Baidu executive said that the company plans to mass produce a driverless car within five years.

Tencent, China’s biggest social-network company, has a research team working on technology that can be used in automated cars, according to a person familiar with the matter. For now, its involvement in Future Mobility—beyond its minority stake as a financial investor—is limited, the person said.

Tencent is an investor in another electric-car maker, NextEV Inc., whose other backers include Sequoia Capital.

The companies are poaching talented engineers from global auto and technology giants, and setting up research centers in the West. Future Mobility has hired 50 engineers from BMW, Mercedes-Benz, Tesla and Google.com. Within 12 months it will have about 600 engineers globally, said Mr. Breitfeld, formerly the project manager for BMW’s i8 plug-in sports car.

He said the company will either build its own plant or partner with an existing auto maker to assemble cars. It has research and development units in Munich and Silicon Valley and is building its headquarters in Shenzhen, where Tencent is based.

Some analysts question how quickly such a new company can achieve its aims. “Several hundred thousand premium cars from an unknown brand sounds like a stretch,” said Bill Russo, managing director at Gao Feng Advisory Co. and former head of Chrysler’s North East Asia business. “Building a brand and competing with the likes of the premium car makers is very difficult. And the competition will not stand still.”

Robin Zhu, a senior analyst at U.S. research company Sanford C. Bernstein, noted that demand for electric vehicles in China is minimal except in big cities where they’re exempt from certain restrictions that apply to their gasoline-fueled counterparts.

The number of electric and hybrid cars and buses sold in 2015 was four times that of a year earlier—but at 331,000 vehicles was a small, subsidy-driven tally in a market where total sales exceeded 24 million.