Bill Russo Chairs Auto Panel Discussion at J.P. Morgan Global China Summit

Beijing, China. June 3, 2015

Bill Russo chaired a panel discussion with the the China CEOs from the top 3 premium carmakers at the 2015 J.P. Morgan Global China Summit.  The topic of the session was The Next Golden Age of China’s Automotive Industry.

Day 2 - Plenary - The Next Golden Age of China's Automotive Industry Safari, Today at 4.52.48 PM

Panelists:

  • Hubertus Troska, Member of the Board of Management, Daimler AG; Chairman & CEO, Daimler Greater China
  • Karsten Engel, President and CEO, BMW Group China
  • Dietmar Voggenreiter, President, Audi China
  • Chair: Bill Russo, Managing Director, Gao Feng Advisory

Click here to watch the video recording of the panel discussion

Click here to see the introductory slides

Competing in the China Truck Market

Gao Feng Insights Report, February 2015

We are pleased to share with you a report titled: Competing in the China Truck Market.

While global brands have enjoyed success in China’s passenger vehicle market, the same cannot be said for the commercial vehicle market. This segment has been dominated by local Chinese manufacturers who have relied on sales to local buyers seeking low-priced equipment. However, we anticipate that several factors will be reshaping the market and competitive landscape in the commercial truck sector, creating a “window of opportunity” in China for participation in what has historically been a predominantly local market.

We believe that market conditions and regulatory challenges will create a need within China’s truck industry to form alliances with foreign partners to secure capabilities which are lacking in the commercial vehicle sector in China. China’s truck manufacturers will need to upgrade their technology to meet demanding new regulations, and will need to improve their service and distribution business practices as the market matures. The changing mix of products towards a higher concentration of line-haul HT, along with anticipated policy changes brought about from China’s intention to reform its State-Owned Enterprises, are driving forces which will alter the landscape of competition in the commercial truck sector.

We welcome your comments and feedback on our report or in general about our firm.  We would be glad to meet you in person to share our data and perspectives in a fuller manner.  Please let us know if you are interested in meeting and discussing directly how we can help you to operationalize these insights.

Thought leadership is core to what Gao Feng does.  We will, from time to time, share with you our latest thinking on business and management, especially as it relates to China and China’s role in the world.

In this paper, we offer our “deeply rooted in China” perspective to the analysis of the impact of each of these developments.

Best Regards,

Dr. Edward Tse
CEO, Gao Feng Advisory Company
edward.tse@gaofengadv.com

Bill Russo
Managing Director, Gao Feng Advisory Company
bill.russo@gaofengadv.com

Tel: +86 10 8557 0676 (Beijing); +852 2588 3554 (Hong Kong); +86 21 5117 5853 (Shanghai)

Gao Feng website: www.gaofengadv.com

China’s Car Factory Binge Risks Hurting Automakers’ Margins

Bloomberg Business, February 13, 2015

Automakers have been successful at adding factories. Maybe too successful

When consultant Bill Russo visited Chery Automobile’s headquarters in China’s eastern Anhui province about three years ago, he listened to the company’s plans to expand its factories to make as many as 1 million vehicles a year. But demand didn’t grow as planned. So Chery today has the capacity to make 900,000 vehicles annually—twice the number of cars it sold last year. Sales have slumped by one-third since their peak in 2010.

“Chery is a classic case” of overcapacity, says Russo, a former Chrysler executive who’s now a Shanghai-based managing director at consultant Gao Feng Advisory. “The pressure is that once they receive the permission [from government authorities] to build, they feel like they have to build.” Chery didn’t respond to requests for comment about its sales falling short of planned capacity.

Domestic and foreign-based carmakers are building more factories in China than anywhere else, a construction binge that risks hurting margins in what remains one of the world’s most profitable vehicle markets. By 2017 there will be 140 car production plants in China, vs. 123 at the end of 2014, estimates JSC Automotive Consulting.

According to IHS Automotive forecasts, factories across the mainland in 2015 will be able to build 10.8 million more vehicles than will be sold in Greater China. In North America, however, IHS expects plants to churn out about 3.2 million more cars this year than the factories were intended to produce when they were built.

Overcapacity is only expected to get worse for Chinese carmakers. China will have about 11.4 million vehicles’ worth of idle capacity by 2017, more than double that of European automakers, according to data from JSC and Deloitte Consulting.

Some carmakers already are regretting plans for Chinese plants that will open in the next few years, says Jochen Siebert, Shanghai-based managing director of JSC, who declines to name the companies. “But that decision has been made,” he says. “It’s done; they cannot backtrack.”

Plans for most of the factory space built in China in the past few years were put in motion during the global recession, when China proved to be a godsend while General Motors and Chrysler were being bailed out by the U.S. taxpayer and Europe’s auto sales seemed in free fall. The trouble is, too many carmakers sought the same refuge.

“When you get too many competitors with too much capacity, there’s just not enough growth to sustain everybody,” says Thomas Callarman, Shanghai-based director of the China Europe International Business School’s Centre for Automotive Research. “They’re all smart people, and they look at the right things, but I think they read the tea leaves wrong.”

For now, the China car market remains profitable. Chinese automakers accounted for 7 of the 10 carmakers with the highest profit margins in the world, with BMW’s Chinese partner, Brilliance China Automotive Holdings, topping the ranks at 8.2 percent in the past year, according to data compiled by Bloomberg Intelligence. Toyota Motor’s margin was 7.6 percent. Hyundai Motor and Volkswagen’s Audi count China as their largest market, with Subaru maker Fuji Heavy Industries standing out as the only car manufacturer among the 10 most profitable that doesn’t have a factory in China.

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Foreign carmakers have been among the most enthusiastic factory builders in China, with Hyundai, Renault, and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles’ Jeep among those that have announced plans or are already building in China.

GM will soon sell Buicks made at a plant that opened last month, with plans to open a Cadillac factory later this year. GM has 22 factories on the mainland. Volkswagen, which is vying with Toyota and GM for the global auto sales crown, has 28 plants in China and will open three more within the next few years.

Jochem Heizmann, who heads Volkswagen’s China business, told reporters in November that the automaker has decided to expand its China capacity to more than the previously targeted 4 million autos a year by 2018 because it couldn’t build enough to keep up with demand.

In the next few years, however, increased competition amid slowing growth in car sales will result in lower prices, says Yang Yipeng, a Beijing-based analyst at Goldman Sachs’s Chinese affiliate. As the world’s second-largest economy cools, vehicle sales are forecast to expand this year at just half of 2013’s 8 percent growth, to 21.3 million passenger vehicles. General Motors President Dan Ammann said in January that he expects China’s sales expansion to slow over the next few years after being the main engine for the global industry’s growth for 15 years. Volkswagen in November also said the pace of expansion is becoming “more normal” in China.

The spare capacity may force carmakers to increase sales incentives, hurting profit margins, Barclays says. “This is a heavy asset industry,” says Song Yang, an analyst at Barclays. “When utilization trends down, margins will trend down.” Already, car dealerships in China are asking for financial support and lower sales targets from carmakers after a combination of rapid expansion of sales networks and increased restrictions on vehicle ownership by city governments hurt their profits. BMW agreed last month to pay 5.1 billion yuan ($815 million) to its dealers. Toyota will give $200 million to the dealers of one of its joint-venture partners, FAW Group, while Renault, which is building a plant that opens in China next year, said it will give its distributors more rebates.

The bottom line: By 2017, plants in China will be able to produce 11.4 million more cars than will be sold there, JSC Automotive forecasts.

 

Click here to read this article at www.bloomberg.com

Toyota Poised to Lose Global Sales Lead to VW on China

Bloomberg News, January 22, 2015

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(Bloomberg) — Toyota Motor Corp., which fended off Volkswagen AG to remain the world’s top automaker in 2014, may lose the sales crown as early as this year as it falls behind in China, the world’s biggest auto market.

Toyota is predicting its global deliveries will decline 1 percent in 2015 to 10.15 million vehicles, or just 10,000 units more than what Volkswagen sold worldwide last year. A new factory the German company is opening this year in Changsha, China, will add capacity for another 300,000 vehicles annually.

As Volkswagen and General Motors Co. add factories to bolster their already-dominant position in China, Toyota President Akio Toyoda’s strategy of foregoing new car plants until at least next year could result in the first shakeup in auto-sales leadership since 2011. Toyota ranks sixth among global automakers in China and sells less than one-third as many vehicles as its two main competitors in China.

“The difference is that Volkswagen has a jet engine strapped to its back called ’China’,” said Bill Russo, Shanghai-based managing director at Gao Feng Advisory Co. “Toyota, unfortunately, is in a position of weakness when it comes to the China market. It would be almost impossible to hold on to a number one position without being in the lead in China, and Toyota’s not even in that league.”

Worldwide sales for Toyota, including at its Hino Motors Ltd. and Daihatsu Motor Co. units, climbed 3 percent to 10.23 million vehicles in 2014, according to a company statement. Volkswagen last week reported a 4.2 percent gain to 10.14 million vehicles, that included its two heavy-truck units. GM followed with sales of 9.92 million units, up 2.1 percent. Volkswagen and GM haven’t announced projections for this year.

China Capacity

Toyota, which hasn’t built an assembly plant in China since 2012 and faces a self-imposed moratorium on new factories until next year, will fall behind even further as Volkswagen and GM step up their expansion plans.

GM has announced plans to add five new plants in China by 2018 even though President Dan Ammann said the market is “maturing rapidly.”

Volkswagen expects to raise its China plant capacity to more than 4 million vehicles by 2018 from 3.1 million at end 2013, according to the company. Mainland China and Hong Kong accounted for a record 3.67 million deliveries at Volkswagen group last year, up 12.4 percent and extending the country’s lead as the German manufacturer’s largest single market.

Sales Target

By comparison, Toyota missed its sales projection for 1.1 million units in China in 2014, even as the Corolla and the Levin compact cars helped boost sales 13 percent to 1.03 million units. The company kept its China sales target unchanged for this year.

Even though Toyota may cede the sales leadership, it still outearns Volkswagen. Analysts estimate Toyota earned a profit of 1.96 trillion yen ($16.7 billion) last calendar year, compared with 10.7 billion euros ($12.4 billion) at Volkswagen.

“Their focus is not No. 1,” said Peggy Furusaka, a Tokyo-based auto-credit analyst at Moody’s Investors Service. “Toyota is more concerned about keeping profitability than chasing numbers. So for coming years, I wouldn’t be surprised to see Toyota selling fewer cars than Volkswagen.”

Toyota’s also-ran status in China is compounded by threats by its dealers to drop out of its network, citing poor sales and a lack of profit.

Dealer Threats

As many as 10 percent of dealers for one of Toyota’s China ventures could abandon the brand, according to the China Automobile Dealers Association. Among the 523 distributors in the FAW-Toyota Motor Sales Co. group, 95 percent are losing money, with some dealers stopping sales or shutting down altogether because of the losses, the state-backed dealer’s group said.

Vehicle sales growth slowed last year in China in tandem with the nation’s weakest economic growth since 1990. Deliveries are forecast to gain 8 percent to about 21.3 million passenger vehicles this year, according to the state-backed China Association of Automobile Manufacturers.

“As long as China is growing rapidly, Toyota will need to build new factories there,” said Yoshiaki Kawano, an analyst with IHS Automotive in Tokyo. “They are probably reserving some energy for growth in the longer term, as they are trying to improve the efficiency at their existing plants.”

To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Alexandra Ho in Shanghai at aho113@bloomberg.net; Ma Jie in Tokyo at jma124@bloomberg.net; Masatsugu Horie in Osaka at mhorie3@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Chua Kong Ho at kchua6@bloomberg.net Suresh Seshadri

Click here to read the original article at www.bloomberg.com